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Click linked poster titles to download and view posters. Posters are made available as we receive them from the authors. 

Posters by Theme
Assessment: Preclerkship  |  Clerkship  |  Longitudinal  
Curriculum: Preclerkship  |  Clerkship  |  MappingIntegrated/Longitudinal 
Implementation: Implementation Strategies


THEME: Assessment: Preclerkship

Course-Level Contributions Toward EPA Implementation (Board:12)

Des Moines University is in the process of determining where and how to assess Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs).  Work has begun at both the college administrative and individual course level.  Here the authors will present a pilot from one second year course that utilized a mapping process to connect knowledge-based assessments with building blocks or foundations that support EPAs.  The course director aligned course level objectives, AOA sub-competencies, and EPA foundations and matched them to specific assessment items to determine whether this information would be useful in tracking student progress toward EPA readiness.  Here the authors will present the linking process and the student performance data to stimulate discussion about the value, usefulness, challenges, and opportunities of such an approach in the context of EPA assessment.

  • Matt Henry, PhD, Associate Professor, DMU-COM
  • Leslie Wimsatt, PhD, DMU-COM

Using Standardized Patients to Evaluate EPAs One and Five (Board: 13)

Principles of Clinical Medicine is a four-part Clinical Medicine Course delivered by the Department of Primary Care is taught during the first four semesters. The course is designed to provide the knowledge and educational experiences that will allow the student to develop active clinical reasoning skills, acquire medical and social knowledge, and develop the skills necessary to complete a comprehensive or focused history and physical examination, demonstrate documentation skills, and demonstrate competency in the clinical application of basic medical procedures. This Department sees the opportunity to assess the EPAs using Standardized Patients, and in this poster, we will demonstrate how EPAs One (Gather a History and Perform a Physical Exam) and Five (Document a Clinical Encounter in the Patient Record) are addressed, integrated and evaluated.

  • Joseph M. Stasio, DO, Department Chair, Professor of Family Medicine, RVUCOM
  • Jill Pitcher, DO, RVUCOM
  • Ann Trawick, DO, RVUCOM

Development and Implementation of a Milestone Training and Evaluation System for the Simulated Clinical Encounter in Undergraduate Medical Education (Board:14)

For clinical skills training in the preclinical education at Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, we constructed a system of developmental milestones to coach and assess clinical skills during simulated patient encounters. Via monthly formative assessments of simulated patient encounters, we use the milestone system to track the progression of competency in EPA 1-4 throughout the second year.

  • Didi Ebert, DO, MPH, MS, Assistant Professor, UNTHSC/TCOM
  • Susan F. Franks, PhD, UNTHSC/TCOM

Demonstrating Integration of Core Competencies OPP 5-6 into EPA 6 through Longitudinal Approaches to Assessment (Board: 15)

William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine (WCUCOM) is exploring the integration of Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) in its Osteopathic Principles and Practices (OP&P) courses. EPA 6 (“Provide an oral presentation of a clinical encounter”), AACOM OMS Core Competency OPP 5 (“Perform or recommend osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) as part of a treatment plan”) and AACOM OMS Core Competency OPP 6 (“Communicate and document treatment details”) are used in a longitudinal manner during OP&P CSAs through the preclinical years.

  • Christopher M. Alfred, DO, Graduate Assistant for Preclinical Sciences, WCUCOM
  • Elizabeth McClain, PhD, WCUCOM
  • Richard Sloan, DO, WCUCOM
  • Eva Shay, DO, WCUCOM

THEME: Assessment: Clerkship

Assessing Multiple EPAs Through a Single Advanced Simulated Rounding Exercise: The OSCE + (Board: 1)

In the summer of 2016, Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine (CUSOM) completed an advanced, full-day, medical team rounding exercise on 20 Standardized Patients (SPs) as part of our third-year student (n=156) "SIM Month" course, established as their first third year rotation.  This single-day exercise provided a very effective means to both expose students to a majority of the 13 EPAs and assess student's level of entrustability.  We will share our plans for incorporating all 13 EPAs into this exercise for future third year students at CUSOM.

  • Steven Halm, DO, Assistant Dean and Chair of Simulation Medicine, CUSOM
  • Brian Mann, MS, PA-C, CUSOM

Night-On-Call: A Simulation Program to Assess Transitioning Students’ Competency in the AAMC’s Entrustable Professional Activities (Board: 3)

The Night-OnCall assessment tool was developed specifically to assess our transitioning medical students with respect to the EPAs.  Data from the study of 80 students is currently underway and will be the topic of a forthcoming presentation. 

  • Adina Kalet, MD, Professor, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Lynn Buckvar-Keltz, MD, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Thomas S. Riles, MD, NYU Langone Medical Center

Transitioning to Third Year Through Transitions of Care: EPA #8 (Board: 4)

To address the need for Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA) based undergraduate medical education curriculum, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) created a course in Spring 2014 geared to 3rd year osteopathic medical students (OMS-III) about to enter into clinical clerkships termed, Introduction to Clerkships (I2C).  The Family Medicine department’s I2C module addressed multiple EPAs involved in the care and transition of an acutely ill patient.  In this transition of care module, learners participated in 3 distinct interactive scenarios with standardized patients (SPs), facilitated by a Family Medicine faculty member, addressing and accessing EPAs 1, 3-4, 6-10, and 13.  Preliminary data shows that this simulation-based education model for EPAs, presented early in the OMS third year, improved learner’s participation, satisfaction, and increased confidence/performance in clinical clerkships.

  • Michael A. Becker, DO, MS, Professor and Vice Chair, PCOM
  • Peter F. Bidey, DO, MSEd, PCOM
  • Harry J. Morris, DO, MPH, PCOM

EPA Assessment at Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine of Midwestern University (CCOM/MWU): A Two-Tier Approach (Board:5)

In order to assess our students’ progress toward the goal of entrustability, we opted for a two-pronged approach: 1) Using the clinical rotation evaluation form and 2) Periodic assessment of skills in a controlled testing environment. Our prior competency based clinical rotation evaluation form has been redesigned into a task based format with an accompanying rubric founded on the AAMC and AACOM discussions of pre- entrustable vs.  entrustable behaviors. We have also developed three independent assessment courses which are scattered throughout the OMS 3 and OMS 4 curriculum.

  • Peg Lechner, MS, RN, Director of Assessment, CCOM/MWU

Using EPAs and Entrustment Scales for Students Core Clerkship Evaluations: Our Experience So Far (Board: 6)

This year we changed our core clerkship evaluation from the competencies to the EPAs.  The AOA EPAs include multiple competencies within their domains and allow us to evaluate students on clinical tasks that make more sense to our clinicians.  The feedback for the students has been more diverse and useful for the individual students.

  • Kollier Hinkle, MD, MHPE, Assistant Dean for Clinical Education/ Associate Professor, UNTHSC/TCOM

Remediation of Oral Presentations Skills for Third-Year Osteopathic Medical Students During Internal Medicine Clerkships at Distant Sites (Board:7)

Based on student case conference performance, a remediation program was designed to improve the oral presentation skills of third-year osteopathic students during their internal medicine clerkship.  At the start of internal medicine in-patient rotations, students perform oral presentations immediately after an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and are graded using a rubric designed by the internal medicine faculty (IM raters). Students requiring remediation are asked to present an actual case over the phone to a different IM rater during the first week of their clerkship. If deemed necessary by the IM rater, repeat phone appointments are arranged to critique other case presentations until the student achieves competency. After the internal medicine clerkships, all students repeat an oral presentation after another OSCE encounter. The change in the average OSCE oral presentation score of remediated students is compared to the change in score of the non-remediated students.

  • Emmanuel P. Katsaros, DO, Chair, Western U/COMP
  • Airani Sathananthan, MD, Western U/COMP
  • Cheri Silverstein Fadlon, MD, Western U/COMP

THEME: Assessment: Longitudinal

A Milestone System for Training and Assessment of Humanism (Board:8)

The purpose of this work is to define and develop a Milestone System of Humanistic skill development for use in undergraduate medical education. Humanism has traditionally been elusive to teach. However, through the focus on interpersonal and communication skills as a developmental process we have been able to adapt humanism to a milestone system for use in training and assessment of this important osteopathic feature of patient care.

  • Susan F. Franks, PhD, Associate Professor, UNTHSC/TCOM
  • April Wiechmann, PhD, UNTHSC/TCOM

Advancing a High Quality Assessment System to Inform EPA Entrustment (Board:9)

High quality assessment systems minimally include formative and summative, reliable and valid measures; data collection from multiple sources via varied methods; sufficient information to accommodate data triangulation; and the use of assessment results to guide improvement efforts.   The Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine (OU-HCOM) has created a model to guide the development of its entrustable professional activities (EPA) assessment toolbox.  The model fosters the use of empirical evidence and best practices in the development of new assessment strategies and instruments as well as in the evaluation of existing ones.

  • Mary Wurm-Schaar, MeD, PhD, Director of Institutional Assessment & Accreditation, OU-HCOM
  • Nicole Wadsworth, DO, OU-HCOM
  • Yang Lai, MIS, MA, OU-HCOM

From Medical Training to Residency, How Well Are Our Students and Graduates Prepared to Perform EPAs? (Board: 10)

We surveyed clinical preceptors and residency program directors to evaluate our students’ and graduates’ performance with EPAs, as a step prior to further modification of our competency-based curriculum. Our surveys had 13 questions designed using EPA language from the AAMC Core EPAs for Entering Residency. Preceptors were asked about students’ readiness to learn the activities, and program directors were asked about graduates’ readiness to perform them without direct supervision. Overall 121 clinical preceptors and 69 program directors completed the survey. For each EPA, our results show comparable answers and an overall satisfaction suggesting that students and graduates met their expectations in performance of these activities. The significant differences observed, especially for EPA#12 “Perform general procedures of a physician” could be due to the complexity of the task and the level of entrustment expected, resulting in more conservative answers.

  • Nathalie Garcia-Russell, PhD, Assistant Dean and Associate Professor, TUCOM
  • Stacey Pierce-Talsma, DO, MS, Chair of OPP Department, TUCOM
  • Juan Carlos Buller, MD, TUCOM
  • Jennifer Weiss, DO, TUCOM

There’s an “APP” for That: Modern Software to Track and Analyze EPAs in the Context of and Throughout the Medical Education Continuum (Board:11)

When it comes to recording, tracking, analyzing, and providing a platform for advisors, deans, and students to reflect on student competency and EPA development, staff and faculty at WesternU/COMP and University of Michigan (MU) will be ready. Over the past decade COMP has developed a holistic student tracking and advising software which automatically integrates data from existing internal and external systems, formerly known as the Academic Progress Portal (APP), now renamed ProgressIQ. ProgressIQ is continuously re-engineered to accommodate increasing levels of abstraction as medical education best practices evolve and advance. UM has developed a Student Performance Record that provides learners and administrators with the data they need to track progress toward competency. As they have and will continue to do so for student didactic, licensing board, learning outcomes, and longitudinal theme performance, these universities will be ready for the new challenges that EPAs bring.

  • Scott Helf, DO, MSIT, CTO, Asst. Dean Academic Informatics, Western U/COMP
  • Johmarx Patton, MD, MHI, Western U/COMP
  • Emmanel Katsaros, DO, Western U/COMP
  • Gerald Thrush, PhD, Western U/COMP

THEME: Curriculum: Preclerkship

Creation of Physician-Mentored Patient Rounds (PMPR) to Observe and Assess Pre-Clinical Medical Students’ Entrustable Professional Activities (EPA) 1-4 (Board: 28)

The pre-clinical years of medical school (years 1-2) focus on the explanatory sciences to inform clinical practice. Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) were created to determine if students can be entrusted with clinical practice. Ways to observe and assess students’ EPA skills are commonly employed during clinical years 3 and 4. If pre-clinical students’ EPA skill development could be observed and assessed, then our students may begin the process of developing EPA skills earlier. A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, utilizes large-group, physician-mentored, patient rounds (PMPR) to observe EPAs 1-4 in pre-clinical students. PMPR involves a patient, a physician mentor and a pre-clinical class of 170 students. Each PMPR is divided into four 30 minute sessions. To assess pre-clinical students’ EPAs 1-4 assignments are given after PMPR sessions 1-3 and aggregated by two faculty members for analysis. Aggregated assignment data is also used by the physician to mentor students during PMPR sessions.

  • Neal R. Chamberlain, PhD, Professor, ATSU/KCOM
  • Patricia S. Sexton, MS, DHEd, ATSU/KCOM
  • Matthew R. Hardee, DO, ATSU/KCOM
  • Robert W. Baer, PhD, ATSU/KCOM

Use of Physician-Mentored Patient Rounds (PMPR) to Observe Pre-Clinical Medical Students’ Ability to Perform Entrustable Professional Activities 1-4 (Board:29)

Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) were created to determine if students can be entrusted with clinical practice. Ways to observe and assess students’ EPA skills are commonly employed during clinical years 3 and 4. If pre-clinical students’ EPA skill development could be observed and assessed, then our students may begin the process of developing EPA skills earlier. A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine utilizes large-group, physician-mentored, patient rounds (PMPR) to observe EPAs 1-4 in pre-clinical students. PMPR involves a patient, a physician mentor and a pre-clinical class of 170 students. Each PMPR is divided into four 30 minute sessions. To assess pre-clinical students’ AACOM EPA skills 1-4, assignments are given after PMPR sessions 1-3 and aggregated by two faculty members for analysis. Aggregated assignment data is also used by the physician mentor to provide aggregate feedback to students during subsequent PMPR sessions.

  • Neal R. Chamberlain, PhD, Professor, ATSU/KCOM
  • Patricia S. Sexton, MS, DHEd, ATSU/KCOM
  • Matthew R. Hardee, DO, ATSU/KCOM
  • Robert W. Baer, PhD, ATSU/KCOM

Using Small Group Case Based Learning to Practice and Assess Multiple EPAs (2, 3 &7) (Board: 30)

Rowan School of Osteopathic Medicine used Small Group Case Based Learning to reinforce, through practice, several EPAs.  Students completed Pre-Class Assessments to form clinical questions and retrieve evidence to advance patient care (EPA 7) as well as, prioritize a differential diagnosis following a clinical encounter (EPA 2).  In-class interactions require students to recommend and interpret common diagnostic and screening tests (3).  Structured cases require students to critically defend their choices of diagnoses and their request for additional information to make a final diagnosis.

  • Millicent King Channell, DO, MA, Assistant Dean of Curriculum, RowanSOM
  • Pam Basehore, EdD MPH, RowanSOM
  • Adarsh K. Gupta, DO, MS, RowanSOM

Promoting Learner Engagement with Team-Based Learning: Implications to EPAs (Board: 33)

Osteopathic medical schools are called to use the Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs).  This necessitates a shift in thinking about assessment and a change of pedagogy.  In the midst of undergoing a major curriculum transformation, the Heritage College has focused on teaching models that promote learner engagement.

Team-Based Learning (TBL) provides a forum for the type of learner engagement required toward mastery of EPAs.

  • Olivia Ojano-Sheehan, PhD, Assistant Director of Faculty Development, OU-HCOM
  • Stephen Davis, PhD, OU-HCOM
  • Nicole Wadsworth, DO, OU-HCOM

Making General Procedures Entrustable in the Early Clinical Years (Board:31)

Until recently, general procedures of a physician were primarily learned and practiced in the third and fourth-year clerkships using the “see one, do one, teach one” approach. Since the birth of simulation, many medical schools have initiated the use of task trainers to allow students to learn and practice procedural skills just prior to their clinical years. It is generally accepted that “practice makes perfect” and it is best to have multiple experiences at a skill to develop automaticity and confidence. Very few medical schools, however, have incorporated experiential and distributive learning of skills into the early didactic years.

  • Andrea P. Mann, DO Associate Dean for Clinical Education, Chair of Pediatrics, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, CUSOM
  • Brian G. Mann, MS, PA-C, CUSOM
  • Jim Powers, DO, CUSOM
  • Steve Halm, DO, CUSOM

Concept Development of OPP and Biomedical Science Integration Emphasizing EPA Milestones (Board: 32)

Entrustable Professional Activity opportunities are moving into the formally - assessed curriculum in undergraduate medical education at the same point in medical education history that the integration of basic science with clinical science is being sought.  The marriage of these distinct, yet related, curricular innovations may be simultaneously accomplished by having students perform a urinalysis on simulated urine as a clinical skill, diagnose a case of cystitis based on basic microbiological, immunological, and physiological factors that are detectable in the urine, and evaluate the use of Osteopathic Principles and Practice (OMM) in treating back pain associated with a diagnosed urinary tract infection (UTI).  It is envisioned the Division of Microbiology (within the Department of Biomedical Sciences) will be able to curricularly integrate with the Department of OPP in formulating a diagnosis based on the results of a performed clinical skill (UA) and evaluating treatment options incorporating OMM lecture - and lab - based concepts of viscerosomatic reflex levels that may be causing somatic dysfunction. EPA opportunities are moving into the formally - assessed curriculum in undergraduate medical education at the same point in medical education history that the integration of basic science with clinical science is being sought.  The marriage of these distinct, yet related, curricular innovations may be simultaneously accomplished by having students perform a urinalysis on simulated urine as a clinical skill, diagnose a case of cystitis based on basic microbiological, immunological, and physiological factors that are detectable in the urine, and evaluate the use of Osteopathic Principles and Practice (OMM) in treating back pain associated with a diagnosed urinary tract infection (UTI).  It is envisioned the Division of Microbiology (within the Department of Biomedical Sciences) will be able to curricularly integrate with the Department of OPP in formulating a diagnosis based on the results of a performed clinical skill (UA) and evaluating treatment options incorporating OMM lecture - and lab - based concepts of viscerosomatic reflex levels that may be causing somatic dysfunction.

  • Kimberly J. Taylor, PhD, Chief, Division of Microbiology, PNWU-COM
  • James R. Keene, PhD, DO, PNWU-COM

THEME: Curriculum: Clerkship

When Should Quality Improvement and Patient Safety be Taught and Assessed? (Board: 24)

Quality improvement and patient safety are critical topics for clinical education, yet ones that have often been without specific coverage in traditional medical school curricula.  The identification of Core EPA #13 as a professional activity for which interns should be entrustable at the start of residency makes it essential that students be taught and assessed on their understanding of QI and patient safety concepts and practices.  Foundational concepts such as these, which don’t specifically “belong” to one discipline, may be easily left out of the rotational structure of the clinical years; however, students are not motivated to learn this clinical material in the preclinical years.  Therefore, the curriculum designer is challenged to identify when and how this concept should optimally be incorporated for effective learning and retention.

  • Victoria Kaprielian, MD, Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Medical Education, CUSOM

Supporting Transition to Residency Through the Use of Multi-media Modules (WISE-OnCall) (Board:25)

The AAMC has called on medical educators to ensure that students demonstrate competence in 13 core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) before entering residency.  Although some of the EPAs such as clinical reasoning and communication are taught during the clinical rotations, few schools have a formal curriculum to address the EPAs and virtually none have a means of assessing and documenting students’ preparedness for residency. To address the curricular need, we have created WISE-OnCall, multi-media instructional modules to help students focus on assessing and managing patients in an effort to improve their preparedness for residency.

  • Thomas S. Riles, MD, Assoc. Dean for Medical Ed & Technology, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Lynn Buckvar-Keltz, MD, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Adina Kalet, MD, MPH, NYU Langone Medical Center

The Use of EPAs, Including, TUCOM’s Distinctly Osteopathic 14th EPA, to Help Third Year Students Integrate Osteopathic Principles into Practice. (Board: 26)

Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine (TUCOM) students in clinical training rotate at a variety of institutions across the country with both DO and MD preceptors. Third year is a critical time for training students to integrate osteopathic principles and skills learned in years one and two into clinical practice and crucial time for assessment using EPAs. The challenge of providing this training and assessment, focused on osteopathic integration, is a larger hurdle than that of training and assessing other clinical skills due to the limited number of DO preceptors and specifically those that continue to use osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) and osteopathic principles and practice (OPP.) We developed an integrated competency based OMM/OPP curriculum that is delivered and assessed during third year. We plan to use this curriculum to assess EPAs and have started EPA assessment with the advanced Clinical distinction OMM track to directly assess our distinctly osteopathic EPA as well others of the 13 integrated EPAs.

  • Jennifer Weiss, DO, Director of Clinical Curriculum TUCOM
  • Stacey Pierce-Talsma DO, MS, TUCOM
  • Melissa G. Pearce, DO, TUCOM
  • Glenn Davis, MS, TUCOM

Clinical Distinction: A Novel Course Offering Allowing Student Growth Using EPAs in Year 3 (Board: 27)

Clinical Distinction, a third-year course, allows students to enhance their profile in self-selected areas of health, unconstrained by the traditional terms of a clinical clerkship. The course requires students to examine their proficiency in the AOA core competencies and in 14 EPAs and to design a program that prepares them for successful clinical work. The course offers students opportunities for growth through a self-directed project that guides them in developing a deeper osteopathic professional identity. Student programs may focus on attainment of skills or knowledge, community service, research, humanities in medicine, global health etc. but all projects are framed within the context of competencies and entrustability. The culmination of the course is a written narrative of growth and learning that informs a key section of the MSPE. Through this evaluation, students distinguish themselves in a language that residency directors value – using EPAs, and competency development.

  • Jennifer Weiss, DO, Director of Clinical Curriculum, TUCOM
  • Walter Hartwig, PhD, TUCOM
  • Glenn Davis, MS, TUCOM
  • Teresita Menini, MD, MS, TUCOM


THEME: Curriculum Mapping

Crosswalk of EPA's in a 4th Year Geriatric Clerkship (Board: 16)

This poster describes the creation of an assessment to crosswalk EPAs and EPA assessment in a mandatory 4th Year Geriatric Clerkship within the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine at the University of North Texas. The geriatric clerkship serves to provide supervised, high quality opportunities for fourth year medical students to apply and transform the declarative medical knowledge and basic clinical skills that they have acquired into procedural clinical competence, while also functioning as learning members of health care teams.

The clerkship experience exposes students to a variety of experiences including ambulatory practice, nursing facilities, assisted living centers, home visits, and hospice. Knowledge is gained through self-study, case reviews, clinical case discussions, working in ambulatory care clinic settings, long term care settings and various didactic sessions.

  • Sandra Marquez Hall, PhD, Assistant Professor / Director Reynolds IGET-IT Program UNTHSC/TCOM

Competencies and Coursework: Triangulating EPAs, Learning Objectives, and Rubrics (Board: 17)

With the importance placed on EPAs and the impact of those tasks on student learning, it has become a foundational part of the curricular discussion to seek ways in which the EPAs can be understood, contextualized, and integrated into medical school coursework. This presentation will document the pedagogical and pragmatic process through which Rocky Vista University connected specific EPAs to course and learning objectives, and, in turn, developed adaptable assessment mechanisms by which qualitative EPAs and objectives were linked.

  • Brian Schwartz, MLIS, Assistant Professor of Medical Informatics, RVUCOM
  • Nicole Michels, PhD, RVUCOM

Designing a Curriculum and Program of Assessment around EPAs (Board: 35)

Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine is in the process of developing a Physician Assistant (PA) program. In keeping with the national drive toward competency-based medical education, the PA program curriculum, teaching methods and assessments will be designed using the entrustable professional activities (EPAs) identified by the AAMC as a template. The Physician Assistant and Osteopathic professional competencies will be woven throughout, to ensure integration of philosophies and that PA-specific accreditation requirements are met.

  • Brian Schwartz, MLIS, Assistant Professor of Medical Informatics, RVUCOM
  • Nicole Michels, PhD, RVUCOM
  • Cathy C. Ruff, MS, PA-C, RVUCOM
  • Debra Nickell, PhD, MBA, PA-C, RVUCOM

Public Health Competencies: from Program Learning Objectives to EPAs (Board: 18)

Doctor of Osteopathy (DO) medical curricula are guided by the Osteopathic Core Competencies for Medical Students (Osteopathic Philosophy and OMM; Medical Knowledge; Patient Care; Interpersonal and Communication Skills; Professionalism, Practice-based Learning and Improvement; and System-based Practice) issued by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). Moreover, the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) has developed 13 Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for medical residency and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has developed Medical Residency Milestones for public health. All these curricular standards contain public health competencies (different from those developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health) that must be covered by medical education curricula. We present the Public Health competencies curricular mapping following a structured and incrementally complex approach (using Bloom's taxonomy) from Core Competencies (Program Learning Objectives) to EPAs and their respective assessments.

  • Eduardo Velasco, PhD, MSc, MD, Associate Dean for Preclinical Education, TUCOM

EPA Integration: Curriculum Mapping and Individual Assessments (Board:19)

Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine (ACOM) is developing a strategy to use EPAs to identify areas in the curriculum that require better focus and more attention based on the assessment of individual student performance. This will also identify student’s deficiencies by EPAs longitudinally and by extension areas of the curriculum that require refocus and reinforcement. Clinical skills assessments are mapped by EPAs and provide longitudinal data to help measure the progression of student performance of an EPA (with particular emphasis on EPA 6). By mapping EPAs to the program outcomes we hope to improve the relevance of the curriculum mapping infrastructure. Additional opportunities to incorporate EPAs in pre-clinical assessments will also be explored with this same goal in mind.

  • Stephen Miller, DO, MPH, Associate Dean of Clinical Sciences, ACOM
  • Maria A. Danzie, BS,  ACOM
  • Emmanuel Segui, MS, ACOM
  • Philip Reynolds, PhD, ACOM
  • James Foster, PhD, ACOM

THEME: Curriculum: Integrated/Longitudinal

Integration and Assessment of EPA 6 in ACOM Curriculum (Board: 20)

This poster is gathering assessment data using various elements of our curriculum, from year 1 through 4, to measure the students’ progression of their level of entrustment for EPA 6.

  • Stephen Miller, DO, MPH, Associate Dean of Clinical Sciences, ACOM
  • Emmanuel Segui, MS, ACOM
  • James Foster, PhD, ACOM
  • Maria A. Danzie, BS, ACOM
  • Philip Reynolds, PhD, ACOM

Informed Consent – Exploring Instruction and Assessment Methodologies (Board:21)

Informed consent is a vital component of the doctor-patient relationship and is critical in maintaining patient autonomy and shared decision making.  The ability to properly obtain informed consent is an essential skill involving a number of interpersonal, legal, ethical and emotional principles.  The importance of this skill has been recognized by both the American Osteopathic Association and the Association of American Medical Colleges as one of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for entering residency.   In terms of undergraduate medical education, there are few published articles which suggest methods of informed consent instruction and evaluation.

  • Jim Powers, DO, Associate Dean for Clinical Integration, CUSOM
  • Andrea Mann, DO, CUSOM
  • Brian Mann, MS, PA-C, CUSOM
  • Steve Halm, DO, CUSOM

Using the Core EPA’s as a Roadmap to Developing a More Linear Medical Education Experience by Introducing Them Early in the Curriculum (Board:22)

Our institution has been proactive in implementing the EPA's into the curriculum even at the earliest level of medical education in an attempt to better prepare the students for clinical medicine.  We have based all lectures and activities on an EPA to direct education toward that goal.  This has resulted in a more linear trajectory in education rather than the traditional model of separation of basic science from clinical rotations.  Success is already being seen as students are entering their clinical rotations.

  • Brandon Isaacs, DO, Associate Dean, PNWU-COM
  • Jim Keene DO, PhD, PNWU-COM
  • Kim Taylor PhD, PNWU-COM
  • Joseph DeMeo DO, PNWU-COM

Applied EPAs Utilizing Narrative Medicine to Foster Student Engagement with EPAs Through All Four Years of Medical School

By designing Narrative Medicine sessions around specific EPAs, we offer a pedagogy that integrates both clinical, and humanistic aspects of the practice of medicine. In this way, students experience the inherent inextricability of the biomedical and interpersonal aspects of medical practice.  This integrated approach imbues the EPAs with a humanistic orientation that is easily neglected in a skill-oriented approach to medical education and practice. Additionally, the course supports the development of an osteopathic professional identity, maintaining relational skills as a prerequisite for maximally successful application of all the EPAs.  Alignment of EPAs with curricular elements allows for an accessible learning experience of the EPAs in practice. Utilization of a rubric to determine entrustability encourages self-assessment of competence in the aligned EPAs.

  • Audra Lehman, MD, Associate Professor, Director of Elective Coursework, TUCOM
  • Elsa Asher MS, CD (DONA), TUCOM
  • Jennifer Weiss, DO, TUCOM

THEME: Implementation Strategies

Institution-Level Progress Toward EPA Implementation (Board:34)

This poster outlines the details of a multi-faceted approach undertaken at Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine (DMUCOM) in support of EPA implementation. We began with a broad review of the structural capacity for change, then launched EPA matrix mapping and several pilot initiatives aimed at locating existing gaps and opportunities for advancing EPA development. Outcomes will be shared, including matrix planning information and examples of institutional resource allocation.

  • Leslie Wimsatt, PhD, Associate Dean, Academic Assessment, Quality and Development, DMU-COM
  • Matthew Henry, PhD, DMU-COM
  • Bret Ripley, DO, DMU-COM

Persistent Challenges to Incorporating EPAs into The Curriculum (Board:36)

EPAs are published to students in a formal document that they receive at Orientation.  Individual faculty efforts to drive EPAs into how students experience the curriculum are underway and are featured in other presentations in this session.  The persistent challenge to incorporating EPAs into the required curriculum is that it requires renovation of existing learning events and existing assessments.  Curriculum renovation requires broad faculty participation, some level of unanticipated funding support, administrative commitment, and a profound level of faculty development.  Achieving curriculum renovation that actually brings EPAs to bear in the delivered curriculum is a persistent challenge when any of these conditions lag behind the others.

  • Walter Hartwig, PhD, Associate Dean, TUCOM
  • Glenn Davis, MS, TUCOM
  • Jennifer Weiss, DO, TUCOM
  • Melissa Pearce, DO, TUCOM

Use of Kotter's Stages of Change for Implementation of EPAs (Board:37)

Kotter’s Stages of Change can be used to provide structure to the development of assessments and serve as a process for assessment of EPAs.  This framework can help an institution communicate a plan for assessment to stakeholders and ensure that all stakeholders are properly incorporated into the process.  In this poster, we will show how we used the stages for one EPA (EPA 6).  This example can provide guidance for how the stages can be used for other EPAs as well.

  • Machelle Linsenmeyer, EdD, Associate Dean, WVSOM
  • Edward Bridges, PhD, WVSOM
  • George Boxwell, DO, WVSOM